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Catholic journalists in Malawi promise to work for the Church

Catholic journalists in Malawi promise to work for the Church

Malawi, May, 10th, 2017 (Canaafrica). The Association of Catholic Journalists (ACJ), a grouping of professional Catholic Journalists in Malawi, held their first ever Annual General Meeting (AGM) in the Lakeshore district of Salima, where a new national executive committee was elected to stir the operations of the organisation in the next three years. During the elections, Augustine Mulomole became the new President for the association replacing Deogratias Mmana. In his acceptance speech as the new President, Mulomole said he, along with his committee, strives to work for the good of the association and at the same time make it vibrant. “We are committed to work for our mother Church through our various skills. We will work with the Episcopal Conference of Malawi and of course seek guidance wherever necessary,” said Mulomole. Taking his turn, out-going President, Mmana said he was delighted to hand over the mantle of Presidency for the new executive committee describing it as a team full of experience journalists which take the association to the greater heights. Meanwhile, the association’s executive committee has lined up a number of activities for carry out from now. Among the objectives of the association include; collecting information for the Catholic church as required by the Episcopal Conference of Malawi and also monitor developments and problems facing the church in evangelization; strengthening ties among Catholic journalists and disseminate information through constant debate and dialogue.  
Pope Francis prays for the Christians of Africa in May video

Pope Francis prays for the Christians of Africa in May video

Vatican City May 9th, 2017 (PWPN). Africa is not often at the center of headlines from around the globe. However, with his May prayer intentions transmitted through The Pope Video, Pope Francis is drawing attention to the tragedies that thousands of Africans endure every day. “We cannot fail to see the fratricidal wars decimating peoples and destroying these natural and cultural resources,” warns the Pope.  “Let us join with our brothers and sisters of this great continent, and pray together that Christians in Africa, in imitation of the Merciful Jesus, may give prophetic witness to reconciliation, justice, and peace,” he exhorts. The Holy Father doesn’t focus exclusively on the problems faced by the inhabitants of the continent; rather Francis highlights the enormous intellectual, cultural and religious patrimony of these nations: “When we look at Africa, we see much more than its great natural richness.” The video also highlights the joie de vivre and the reasons for hope that characterize Africans. But, at the same time, it stresses the urgent need to end conflicts that are decimating populations, as well as threatening the vitality of the African heritage. In November 2015, the Holy Father visited Kenya, Uganda and the Central African Republic. Already then, he expressed concern about the growing violence in those countries. “You must be courageous…. Courageous in forgiving, courageous in loving, courageous in building peace,” he told young people there. He also assured them, “you will win the hardest battle in life; you will win in love.”   Jesuit Father Frédéric Fornos, international director of the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network and the youth branch, the Eucharistic Youth Movement, notes how “the Pope has also denounced the shameful silence in the face of the massacres in North Kivu (Democratic Republic of Congo).” “I was in this region in January of this year,” Father Fornos said. “There are members of the laity, nuns, friars and priests who courageously seek ways of dialogue and peace, denouncing the interests of many and risking their lives. For all of them, the words and prayers of Pope Francis are a great support. Below, find the full text: When we look at Africa, we see much more than its great natural richness We see its joie de vivre, and above all, we see grounds for hope in Africa’s rich intellectual, cultural and religious heritage. But we cannot fail to see the fratricidal wars decimating peoples and destroying these natural and cultural resources.  Let us join with our brothers and sisters of this great continent, and pray together that Christians in Africa, in imitation of the Merciful Jesus, may give prophetic witness to reconciliation, justice, and peace.